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What is a Gerbera Daisy?

The Gerbera Daisy, a vibrant bloom bursting with cheer, is a popular choice for gardens and bouquets alike. Known for its large, colorful petals and sunny disposition, it symbolizes purity, innocence, and beauty. With a rainbow of hues, it's a florist's dream. Curious about how to care for these delightful flowers? Discover the secrets to keeping Gerbera Daisies thriving.
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

A Gerbera daisy is a flowering plant in the sunflower family, Asteraceae. The Gerbera daisy is a popular choice of ornamental flower because of its vibrant colors and long blooming period in temperate weather. Gerbera daisies are also well suited to use as cut flowers, since they can last for up to two weeks if they are well tended and have plenty of water. Many garden supply stores sell Gerbera daisy plants in the spring, as well as seeds.

Alternate names for the Gerbera daisy include Transvaal and Barberton daisies, after the regions in Africa where the Gerbera daisy was first discovered by Europeans in the 1880s. The plants were named for Traugott Gerber, a friend of Linnaeus. The reason for the honor is somewhat unclear, as little is known about Gerber. The flowers quickly skyrocketed to popularity, since they grow well both indoors and out, and they make excellent cut flowers. To prolong the life of cut Gerberas even longer, change the water every three to four days and snip the bottom of the stems.

Gerbera Daisies were first discovered by Europeans in Africa.
Gerbera Daisies were first discovered by Europeans in Africa.

Like other flowers in the sunflower family, the Gerbera daisy is characterized by a broad flower with long, brightly colored petals on an elongated, fleshy stalk. The daisies come in yellow, orange, pink, white, and sometimes lavender, depending on the cultivar. Approximately 10 species of Gerbera daisy appear in domestic gardens, and another 40 can be found growing in the tropics of Africa, Asia, and South America. The plants prefer temperate weather, and will do best in USDA zones nine and warmer. Colder weather will damage them, rendering them unable to bloom.

If the flowers are regularly trimmed and Gerbera daisies are kept healthy, they can keep blooming for months. It is important to watch out for signs of rot on the leaves, which should also be regularly trimmed to prevent rot from setting in to begin with. Gerbera daisies like to grow in full to partial sun, and they prefer moist but not wet soil.

When grown from seed, a Gerbera daisy is not always true to the parent plant. Gardeners who want to replicate favorite plants should propagate from cuttings or root division, bringing the plants inside during the winter months to keep them healthy. Otherwise, in warm climates, the plants will be perennials, returning year after year to brighten the garden. In colder zones, the Gerbera daisy will die off in the winter.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a HomeQuestionsAnswered researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a HomeQuestionsAnswered researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...

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Discussion Comments

anon270608

I bought a gerbera plant from a cut price supermarket for about £2.99, and have fallen in love with the plant. It sits on my kitchen windowsill, and apart from being incredibly thirsty, just sits there flowering away. After it's first blossoms began to die, I cut the flower stems back, and it now has another five new blossoms. A really lovely, cheerful little plant, and I suspect, the first of many.

worrellkim

How do I take care of my gerbera daisy? Specifically how and when do I cut the flowers when they die?

anon13902

I have several gerbera daisies planted with dead flowers on them. How do I trim these so they will last awhile? Do I just pull the dead heads off?

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    • Gerbera Daisies were first discovered by Europeans in Africa.
      By: Ruslan Olinchuk
      Gerbera Daisies were first discovered by Europeans in Africa.