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What are Child-Proof Containers?

Autumn Rivers
By
Updated May 16, 2024
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The point of child-proof containers is to make it difficult for kids to open certain items that could be dangerous. They usually require users to perform two or more functions at once in order to get access to the contents, as most young children struggle with this concept. For example, many child-proof containers can only be opened when the cap is pushed down and turned at the same time. This type of mechanism can make it hard for young children to get ahold of items like medications, cleaning products, and food. It should be noted that such containers do not guarantee that children will not get into them, as some kids have few problems figuring out how to get past these obstacles.

One of the most common types of child-proof containers is the medicine bottle. In fact, the majority of prescription and over-the-counter drugs are placed in child-proof bottles. These usually have a plastic cap that must be pushed down on, while being turned counter clockwise to open. Such bottles often allow adults to turn the cap upside down and screw it into place on the top of the bottle, as it is not child-proof when used this way. This method can allow for easy access to adults in households without children, and may be necessary for those who have trouble pushing down hard on the cap, such as elderly or disabled adults.

There are other items that need to be stored away from children, as well, such as cleaning products. For this reason, there are child-proof containers that are large enough to store various products that should be kept away from kids. They may be in the form of small bottles, or they might be large bins that act as a catch-all for many items. These child-proof containers usually come with locks, requiring either a key or the strength to push down on the lock while also turning it. Adults who want to be especially mindful of safety may place smaller child-proof bottles in this larger child-proof bin, making it even more difficult for most kids to gain access to the contents.

Some child-proof products are meant to prevent messes rather than safeguard dangerous items. For instance, there are child proof food containers that allow adults to put food inside easily, while making it difficult for children to dump the contents on the floor. These usually come with lids that require an adult's help to open, but they often have a small opening that is covered by plastic flaps. This can allow young kids to reach into the container to grab food, but it tends to stop the food from spilling out all at once when the container is knocked over. Most child-friendly drink containers work similarly, helping to avoid messes.

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Autumn Rivers
By Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers, a talented writer for HomeQuestionsAnswered, holds a B.A. in Journalism from Arizona State University. Her background in journalism helps her create well-researched and engaging content, providing readers with valuable insights and information on a variety of subjects.
Discussion Comments
By Pippinwhite — On Jan 29, 2014

I have heard it said that child proof containers were actually more adult proof than anything else. Goodness knows, I've tried to grab the headache pills in the dark, only to have to try to line up the little arrows so I could open the bottle. Not fun. The push down and turn bottles are just as bad.

The nice thing about not having kids in the house is that when I get my scrips filled, I can get the regular cap. I don't have to worry about the cats figuring out how to open bottles. That’s a good thing in the morning, before I’ve had my coffee.

Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers, a talented writer for HomeQuestionsAnswered, holds a B.A. in Journalism from Arizona State University. Her background in journalism helps her create well-researched and engaging content, providing readers with valuable insights and information on a variety of subjects.
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